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That is One Small Step for Bandwidth. One Giant Leap for ISP’s.

One Small Step for Bandwidth

That is One Small Step for Bandwidth. One Giant Leap for ISP’s.

Actually it is not that small of a step for bandwidth. NASA has come up with a device that transmits data at the rate of 100 megabytes per second. This compares to the 1 to 3 megabytes per second from a typical high-speed internet service provider. 

I have got to hand it to Sean Michael Kerner for posting his article in Inter netnews.com entitled From the Moon to the Earth at 100 Mbps. I was simply minding my own business, surfing the net for anything of interest, when I stumbled upon Kerner’s article. So my first thought was, 

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‘So NASA has come up with yet another innovation in order to justify its existence.’ I recalled the ever popular “Tang” and then there was Velcro, digital watches, and the ubiquitous handheld calculators. To be fair most, if not all, of the modern conveniences we enjoy today and cannot live without began or in some way had their impetus in the space program. And so I read on. This one will truly be revolutionary.

Kerner’s article linked to Jan Wittry’s article entitled The Ultimate Long Distance Communication. Wittry reports th at NASA has launched the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (“LRO”) to collect data about the moon to include massive amounts of images, and data about the moon’s geography, climate, and environment. This information will then be sent back to earth to help scientists create high-resolution 3-D maps of the moon’s surface. The transmission of this massive amount of data, in almost real time, is due to a NASA custom designed and handmade 13 inch device called a Traveling Wave Tube Amplifier.

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I strongly suggest you read Wittry’s article and discover the various uses already contemplated for such technology (i.e. Use in communication satellites for tracking oceanic flights, icebergs, volcanic eruptions, forest fires, and severe weather.) Kerner mentions the most obvious use in his article when he mentions the ability to “boost data delivery” for content delivery on the internet.

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