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Right Microsoft ERP Product for Your Business

Right Microsoft ERP Product for Your Business

What’s the Right Microsoft ERP Product for Your Business?

Right Microsoft ERP Product for Your Business

As some of my readers may recall I posted an article to this Blog on May 17, 2020 entitled Microsoft Buys Core Technology to Boost Its ERP Offering. The article mainly commented on Microsoft’s most recent purchasing strategy to boost its Dynamic ERP product offerings. After reading my article, Houston Neal, Website Content Manager for Software Advice for Manufacturing contacted me and asked me to read and comment on his article entitled Microsoft Dynamics for Manufacturing – Understanding the Difference Between GP, NAV, SL and AX. Neal’s take on the current situation is that although Microsoft has tried to establish itself as a player in the ERP market space, enterprises may still be confused as to what product(s) would be suitable to which industry.

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I have read Neal’s article and was quite impressed. I’m a person that likes to understand the history behind the product and/or company. Neal does a nice job of detailing the 8 year evolution of Microsoft’s foray into the ERP industry. He starts off with a sort of Gantt Chart that breaks down the different target markets for each of the Microsoft Dynamic products.  From the enterprise size, based on number of employees, it looks as though Microsoft has taken a comprehensive approach to the SME market space and taken aim on competing directly with SAP and Oracle in this space. Increase in IT Budgets is Broad but Not Deep

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I particularly liked the section where Neal describes Microsoft’s initial purchases and the making of the Dynamics portfolio of products. First there was the Great Plains acquisition in 2001 which netted the Great Plains accounting application and the Solomon business management applications. Then there was the Navision purchase in 2002 which garnered not only the human resources and CRM applications, but also the Axapta product line from a recent acquisition by Navision.

So what is Microsoft to do with four different enterprise products (Great Plains, Solomon, Navision, Axapta) each written in a different language, running in different development environments, and using different databases? Neal takes us on a tour of the daunting task that Microsoft laid out for itself to convert all four products to a single code base, Project Green.

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Neal includes an evolutionary chart of which Dynamic products have become the product of choice for which industry. He reminds us that over 9000 ISV’s are out there providing customization services and support for these products. He concludes his article by stating that growth in the Dynamic Product line appears evident.

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